The Emperor’s Young Clothes

UPDATE: Veteran actor Bill Paxton, who plays the character this post is about, died on February 26th, 2017. I’d just like to clarify this post is not about Bill Paxton’s performance. In fact, he’s by far the best actor on this show and clearly does his best to save it, but in the end it’s a team effort and his effort alone is just not enough.

It’s Training Day, y’all!

Compated to the movie of the same name, the show is a bit lame, but it’s still better than the train wreck that was Rush Hour, just not as funny. This is just a quick post about something I noticed in episode 3 (and others, but it was most prominent here).

In a flashback at the end of that episode, we see Max Payne Detective Whatshisface shooting a dude and rescuing a girl. Apparently, this was 20 years ago, and here’s our hero:

Image (c) CBS

Image (c) CBS

And this is the same guy 20 years later:

Image (c) CBS

Image (c) CBS

Not much of a difference, you say? Neither do I since it’s the same actor. He even sports a similar beard and haircut, but in the first shot he’s wearing a hoodie and t-shirt to make him appear younger. I’d say he aged well since he manages to look worse twenty years ago.

Of course they could have cast a younger actor that looks alike like most shows would do, but … nah, screw it, that would cost money.

Ironically they manage to cast a perfect young counterpart to an older character in episode 4. Sometimes I really don’t know what’s going on behind the scenes.

Why so serious?

After the GPS issues revealed in episode 3 of NBC’s show Crisis, I knew I should go back and watch the older episodes again. And so I did, starting with the show’s pilot episode, and boy, did I find some comedy gold in there – probably the only thing redeeming this mess of a show.

So, the episode starts with the kids of about two dozen influential parents – among them the US president’s son – being taken hostage by some rather well informed kidnappers. The kids get shoved into a truck trailer where they have to stand next to each other along the walls. They are all pretty frightened as they would be when being abducted by obviously dangerous criminals with automatic rifles … well, all but one at least. Can you spot him?

Picture (c) NBC

Picture (c) NBC

Yeah, he’s third from the left and looks like he’s going to explode into a fit of laughter any second now. Here, have some more shots of him:

Picture (c) NBC

Picture (c) NBC

At least he can see the funny side of it all.

However, that’s not the only thing that went wrong here. After some other scenes, everyone has been loaded into the truck and the kidnappers are closing the door. We get this shot of some of the key characters standing side by side looking frightened (well, except that one guy to the right who’s now looking rather ill from having to suppress all that laughter, but he’s quick to turn his head away this time). Here, let me number them for you for easier reference:

Picture (c) NBC

Picture (c) NBC

The very next shot shows the entire truck interior with the hostages who are starting to sit down, and it clearly shows the characters have moved around:

Picture (c) NBC

Picture (c) NBC

I’m not 100% sure about number 3, but judging by the clothes and the hair it’s probably safe to assume that it’s indeed her.

When the news break about the kids being taken, the school is under siege by the FBI and obviously the media as well. There are lots of trucks and cars outside with camera crews setting up, and our FBI agent is rushing through towards the school to explain to the parents that the FBI is clueless. She passes a media truck …

Picture (c) NBC

Picture (c) NBC

… with an empty license plate holder at the front. At least according to Wikipedia, cars in Washington D.C. are required to sport a license plate on front and back, so it’s probably not a good idea to park your van with a missing license plate right next to the cops, crisis or no crisis.